Farewell, Princess.

The death of Carrie Fisher today at the young age of 60 is going to be especially hard for people around my age (52, if you were wondering). This is the passing of a slice of our collective memories.

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Princess Leia was a character like no other. In 1977, just 20 at the release of “A New Hope” and 19 when it was filmed, Leia was sassy, smart, sexy and could wield a blaster. She would go toe-to-toe with Vader, lead an army without fear and still be the object of affection of both male leads. (Remember at this point, she didn’t know Luke was her brother).

CarrieĀ didn’t always speak well of Leia, calling the her a caricature. But to the legions of us who grew up on Star Wars, Leia is legend.

Carrie Fisher was an accomplished writer and actress. Outside of Star Wars, she appeared in When Harry Met Sally … , wrote the novel and screenplay “Postcards from the Edge” and was the uncredited “script doctor” on countless films.

Carrie battle bi-polar disorder, something she openly spoke about in the last decade or so. She took public criticism for her weight gain and would say “My body is a product of my mind”. She lots 30 lbs for her “comeback role” in The Force Awakens.

Her passing today as such a young age is a time for a little sadness. Remember her beloved mother, Debbie Reynolds who now faces the tragic task of saying good bye to her own daughter. But as long as the human race is watching movies, her performance as Princess Leia, the diminutive, tough, bagel-bunned heroine of Star Wars will live as one of the most memorable characters in film history.

 

“I signed away my likeness. Every time I look in the mirror I have to send Lucas a couple of bucks.”